Planting Tree Seeds

I’m helping my 13-year old plant Honey Locust Tree seeds.
Starting his nursery side business.
Drought Tolerant and fast growing. Which is needed in Colorado.

Planting trees and entrepreneurial dreams. :herb::palm_tree:

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Nice! Good for both of you. Love hearing about stuff like this

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Had one in our front yard growing up. Good stuff.

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Is that something he came up with on his own or did you have to steer him? I’m always curious to hear from other parents about that kind of stuff.

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I had to steer him. We saw some seed pods from a variety of trees in a public park. I suggested we collect some and try and plant them. Then I told him how expensive trees were at a nursery and it was something he could make some decent side money on for not much work and time.
I then had him watch some tree seed germination videos on YouTube.

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It’s a good start until he gets into the pot growing business.

:crazy_face:

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I never know when or how much to push them. My daughter is 10 and my son 6. My daughter has this great love of science at a level well beyond her years. She’s always grabbing her moms old college books and reading them. She’s very much into how the body works. She’ll look at pictures of dissected body organs and identify the different parts. I try to encourage that to a point. As she gets older I’ll be ok with her being exposed to more, but I worry about her consuming too much graphic content. At the same time she’s really into the science of the body. I don’t know.

My son is just a happy go lucky goofy kid. He loves music. All kinds of music. My wife listens to nothing but Spanish music and he really takes to the sound. At the same time he loves modern music and would listen to Johnny Cash with his great grandpa. He’s so small so I didn’t really know what to buy him so he has a ukulele guitar. It’s cute because it’s just a mini acoustic for him. He loves it and plays it all the time.

Kids are each unique in their own way. I enjoy watching their interest come out and trying my best to encourage them. Except that video game crap. I don’t encourage that. I do encourage work ethic and working for what they want. I do it in small ways now, but will keep increasing that.

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Awesome dadding, my brother!

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Love planting seeds… Don’t do it exactly right but I’m always burying apple cores, acorns and maple seeds. Deer might hammer any saplings that come up but whatever. If we get a decent one started I’ll fence it. I bought a few bur oak saplings from the arbour day foundation and fenced those.

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It is literally the easiest thing to do in the world. Walnut trees drop hundreds if not thousands of pods. Hazel nuts. Acorns by the thousands. I have to thin them out just from natural dropped seeds, pine cones and such.

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I wish we had those kinds of trees out here. I miss those oaks and such.

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I have a neighbor near our camp property that is going to give me a bunch of bur oak acorns… Bur oaks are such a beautiful species of white oak. I know wouldn’t get to enjoy them when they’re big but maybe the kids and grandkids kids would. They have a very diverse growing climate/terrain and deer and black bear love them.

We planted a few saplings in TN too which did better than all other trees we planted. We also had some big old black walnut trees down there but we always just tossed the fruit in the long grass.

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Just saying. My property was barren. I ordered some seedlings and planted them. I picked up walnuts at my wife’s family farm and walked around the property stepping on them. I picked up every acorn and hickory nut and pine cones on a walk through the forest. I have eastern white pine, white spruce, black spruce and cedar. Maples grow everywhere. My neighbors ask if they can have seedlings of the trees they like. Take a walk almost anywhere and you can pick up bags of walnuts and acorns in Michigan. I have a neighbor with a buckeye tree, his wife asked me to poison it, because she hates them. I had one mulberry tree I have twenty now.

Got the property set up for wildlife. Hickory nut, hazel nut, beech nut, walnut, chestnut, maples, red oak, white oak, burr oak, cedars, apple trees, peach trees, plum trees, pear trees and cherry trees. Planted , holly, white pine, white spruce, highbush cranberry, lilacs and such. The thing is I have two flocks of turkeys walk through three times every day. Deer sleep by my hedges. I have three honey locust trees. I can walk out on my porch and watch birds, deer and turkey and they don’t run. They come for food. Cool part is I get hawks, owls and even a bald eagle every now and then. I had no interest until my kid asked what kind of bird was that. I learned so I could teach them. My kid sells butterflies and runs breeding of bees and butterflies from his home. He has sold lizards, preying mantis, and other things on line. All from the respect for wildlife he learned from home. He has planted every type of butterfly plant he could including getting his house designated as a butterfly sanctuary. He has traveled to find and count salamanders with some famous photographers of the same. It just shows you what encouraging the interest in something will do for your kid. We traveled the U.P. For years, now he brings his friends there and vacations on Isle Royale.

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I had bad luck with our maples in TN. 2 of 7 lived. All 4 bur oaks made it. That is without watering any of the trees. Just kind of seeing what will take and where.

At our UP property we have a few mature sugar maples and transplanted a couple reds from camp. Also planted a few Doug fir and Norway spruce that were free. Deer ate some of the Doug firs before the snow covered them. Seems we have to fence almost everything to keep deer, rabbits and mice from killing them. Except for balm and poplar of course. After the dying spruce and balsam were cut for chipping on our 40 a network of balm came up quickly in 2 areas. Got a few young iron woods too.

We had several types of animal on trail cam over the last 2 years. I’ll be getting a bit more into food plots this year. Previous years we just planted rye, oats, clover, rape, peas and radishes to see what would grow and what would get eaten first and what time of year. Might add a few watering holes too.

I’ve had more luck on mock scrapes in shooting hours than food sources but it’s clear the food sources keep the does in the area.

Most of the states west of the Mississippi are not good places for trees to grow just based on climate and soil. The Southeast of the US has some crazy amount of tree species, but they have the climate that trees need, warm and wet. I think for the rest of the US, we need not worry about the trees as much as the grass and crops.

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Best way I have found is get a pamphlet on native trees. Many of those are food sources for wildlife. Take the best soil you can afford and dig a hole twice as big as you need fill your hole until you can place your tree according to its instructions and fill with the rest of your soil. If you are shy of the top use the soil from your hole. That lower level of good loose soil is not compacted like most soils are, giving the roots a much easier environment to grow in. An old timer I know used to use an old pair of leather shoes. The leather would decay in the hole keeping the roots a small area of uncompacted enriched soil. The northern soil is great for White Pine and oaks. Water it the first day. Wait and water it a second time after the ground soaks it up. If it is spring the trees will be fine. Midsummer, once a week unless withering heat. One bucket to five trees, about a gallon a tree. I lost some the first year I was planting but only one since and it was a 400 dollar dogwood for my wife. Followed the instructions and the damn thing still died. It told me to plant the tree in an area protected from western wind. I have a tree line which protects from the north so I planted in east of my house. I believe it would have done better in the sun all day but, last time I bought a tree, though.

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Our Thornless Honey Locust came up really quick. I was very surprised.
Now we are starting some Kentucky Coffee Trees.

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Nobody will read this, but oh well.

I can’t wait to possibly have a back yard one day, even in this baron desert.

Until then, I have an Aerogarden inside, and I absolutely love it. I know they aren’t trees, but having fresh herbs on hand makes such a massive difference when cooking.

I want to get another one just for tomatoes when we get more space.

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I’ve had a lot of success growing with hydroponics, but using a drain to waste method, I’ve never tried aeroponics. Are you growing in a window or under lights?