We're just a few years from the tipping point in engineered food

Buy Your Stock Early & Get Rich

  • We’re just a few years from the tipping point in engineered food.
  • Traditional agriculture’s 10,000-year-run is about over.
  • Better foods, tastier foods, and cheaper foods are on the way.

From 2012 to 2023, the costs of protein in the U.S. from cows vs. precision-biology food technology will reach parity, says independent think tank RethinkX. It will be a tipping point after which acceptance of modern foods will accelerate quickly, leaving the cattle industry effectively bankrupt by 2030 and five years later down to 10 percent of its current size.

2 Likes

Holy Schnikey…

The many impacts of the coming disruption

The ramifications of the protein disruption extend across a range of areas by 2030 and 2035, and the report breaks them into four categories.

Economic

  • PF foods and products will be at least 50 percent, and as much as 80 percent, lower as current products. This will result in substantial savings for individuals. The average U.S. family will save $1,200 a year, adding up to $100 billion a year for the nation by 2030.

  • The revenues of the U.S. beef and dairy industry and their suppliers will decline by at least 50 percent by 2030, and in 2035 by nearly 90 percent. The other livestock and fishery industries will follow.

  • The volume of cattle feed crops required in the U.S. will fall by 50 percent by 2030. Revenues for cattle feed will therefore fall by more than 50 percent.

  • Farmland values will collapse by 40–80 percent, with regional variations dependent upon alternate uses and other variables.

  • Countries heavily invested in animal-product production will suffer significant economic shocks. An example would be Brazil, where 21 percent of GDP is derived from such industries.

  • Oil demand from the agriculture industry in the U.S. for production and transportation will largely disappear.

2 Likes

Wow, thanks for posting. I’m skeptical about this type of futurism, but would welcome this future with open arms. So many benefits for mankind, very few drawbacks. The disruption would be painful for farmers, obviously, but this could be a really, really great thing for the planet and economics. Bring it on.

1 Like

I think the mass slaughtering of animals for food is one of the things people 100 years from now will look back and say, “they really did that?” The same way we look back at people who had to use outdoor plumbing or the way kids now look at a pay phone.

3 Likes

It’s a brutal business. Unconscionable at this point.

Yup! They’re making awesome headway, in this industry. Wonder how Monsanto, Tyson foods, et al respond?

This feels like something that would be harder to have a monopoly on, as well. They have SO drastically reduced the cost, and I’ve read the goal is to get it to 50 cents/lb. Awesomeness!

Been a big honk about this for a long time.

Feedstock volumes, massive scale-up, govt red tape and BigFood protectionism are going to be governors on this, but it’ll happen, maybe not as fast as these projections though. Hope they do.

1 Like

What a perfect way to dumb down the nobody’s.
Diet has a huge effect on brain power. Sorry, I’ll never trust the government and Monsanto with my food.
Luckily, I grew up very poor and learned how to feed myself in the woods.

3 Likes

We’re all forgetting the biggest advantage… No more cow farts, AOC will be so pleased

2 Likes

That girl needs some meat protein in her life.

I’m the same, but I o see good people behind this work. As for big food, the FDA, and the rest of the govt, they never cared and won’t any time soon.

I’d be medium to slow to transition. I’d want some data over time, to see exactly the impact this is having on humans. I also wonder if there’s a possibility it could be done CORRECTLY with fruit and veggies in a non-GMO/GMO sorta way, if you know what I mean. LOL

I kind of equate this news, to the news of hybrid and electric vehicle from 20 to 15 years ago.
In the old OTT, I was the first person there to start posting and discussing that this technology was coming down the pipe. I had quite a few heated arguments with some of our friends there. Some that said it would never happen. Sid being the loudest adversary. Well, look at the news about Tesla today. That technology is here to stay and is slowly kicking the internal combustion engine to the curb.

“Though the Model 3 is currently king of the proverbial hill, the electric car market will see several important new models coming to market in the coming months (including some pricey pickup trucks and sports cars). For its part, Ford is generating tons of enthusiasm with its coming Mustang Mach-E full electric crossover SUV, already racking up enough pre-orders (with refundable $500 deposits) to sell out its allotment of First Edition models. The Mach-E will come to market late in 2020 and will compete most directly with Tesla’s new Model 3-based Model Y compact crossover, expected around mid-year. As it is, with consumers shunning sedans in favor of taller crossovers these days, the Model Y will undoubtedly cannibalize Model 3 sales and could fast become the automaker’s top-selling model.”

2 Likes

I’m not sure how to feel about this. haha.

1 Like

Yeah, we don’t know, what we don’t know, for sure.

1 Like

I’ll give her all the meat she can handle, as long as she wears a gag. She is some prime cut…

1 Like